Up Next: Millie Keith #1 and #2

I’ve turned the last page of pilgrim’s progress. It was the end of a good book which I think the Lord was pleased to use in my heart and life. I hope to share a review soon, together with some final thoughts inspired by the words of John Bunyan. In the meantime, let me disclose the next book on my to-read list, which I’ve already begun.

Apparently Martha Finley’s Millie Keith series, together with her other Life of Faith series’, a really well-known in some circles. Originally published in the 1800s, these books have been adapted for pre-teens and young teens of our day. Each series follows the life of a character and her walk with God.

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The Ultimate Writer Tag – Part Two

Hi, dear readers! This post is out a bit late due to my computer being at the repair shop yesterday. Now I’m back and running again!

I’m doing the Ultimate Writer Tag. Thanks, Emily, for inviting me to join in. You can see my part one here, in which I answered questions one to eight. I’ll post the tag rules again, then answer the remaining questions.

The rules

  • Link back to the writer who tagged you.
  • Answer all of the questions, including the “Ultimate Writer Question”.
  • Make up your own “Ultimate Writer Question”.
  • Tag as many writers as you’d like.
  • HAVE FUN AND BE NICE.

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Our Sure and Unshakeable Anchor

I have a fresh respect for allegory. If you’ve kept up with my posts recently, this comes as no surprise. Prompted by my appreciation for The Pilgrim’s Progress, I’ve thought about whether or not Isolated contains any allegorical elements.

The story as a whole is certainly not an allegory. But I can think of two individual (‘isolated’, if you will) allegories that play a small part within the whole.

If you’ve read Isolated and want to engage in some thought work on it, I hope you’ll enjoy this post. You won’t enjoy it if you haven’t read Isolated and don’t like spoilers, or if you don’t like picking apart and analyzing the experience of a book.

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The Ultimate Writer Tag

Emily from A Purpose and a Promise once did a tag on her blog called The Ultimate Writer Tag. I wasn’t exactly tagged in it, haha, but she did say in the comments that I could feel free to do it. More than a year later, I’ve stumbled upon this post draft in my blog editor, and here I am today to bring it to light.

Rules

  • Link back to the writer who tagged you (That would be Emily. Thanks Emily!)
  • Answer all of the questions, including the “Ultimate Writer Question”.
  • Make up your own “Ultimate Writer Question”.
  • Tag as many writers as you’d like.
  • HAVE FUN AND BE NICE.

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Allegory VS “Plain” Novel?

There’s the “Antique Allegory” and the “Contemporary Christian (novel)”. I’ve given these unofficial terms to two sorts of Christian literature identified by Wikipedia. Honestly, I’d never made the distinction. I would have lumped them together. But being drawn to Christian allegory for its unique qualities after having read Pilgrim’s Progress, my interest was piqued and I wanted to learn more.

Wikipedia, haha!

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How Pilgrim’s Progress Changed the Way I Pray

If it wasn’t for wanting to make the post title an appropriate length, I would have specified that John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress changed the way I pray for lost people in my life. Let me go ahead and explain.

The book opens with a man. He grew up in the fictional City of Destruction, representative of the human condition of lostness. After reading a certain book, he’s made aware that his city and all its inhabitants are destined to be destroyed. He too would be destroyed if nothing changed. As he understood and believed the things written in the book, Christian (for that is the man’s name) developed a burden on his back.

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Quote From Isolated

Yes, Isolated is YA suspense. I try to pack my stories with edge-of-your-seat plot twists. But it’s not all scares and woes, either. The quote I want to share with you comes from a euphoric scene. Of all the scenes in Isolated that make me beam inside whenever I edit or re-read them, this one probably ranks second.

This quote is removed from its context and won’t have its full impact, but nonetheless, here it is:

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Reblogged: Puritan Study

I expected to enjoy Pilgrim’s Progress. My reading experience, however, has far exceeded my expectations.

The text is oozing with rich Christian allegory. The book has stimulated my desire to be a faithful and devoted servant of the Most High God. I can’t think how else to describe the reading experience but that it’s been glorious! And it’s kindled in me a desire to read more literature like It.

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Initial Thoughts: Pilgrim’s Progress

I’ve read Pilgrim’s Progress before. Twice. Once it was a children’s edition with gorgeous full-color pictures. Then, when I was older, I read the full book but re-written in modern English. This time I’m reading an edition closer to the original, which John Bunyan wrote in the 1600’s.

Pilgrim’s progress is an allegory. It’s the daring adventure of a man who left his family and home on a hazardous journey to the Celestial City. At face value, it’s a tale of adventure, but it’s also symbolic of the Christian life. What I recently learned was that the author wrote it while in prison for his faith. Doesn’t that just make his message all the more strong?

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